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It does not matter if your guests are travelling for pleasure or business, there are times when getting a good night’s sleep can be a taxing proposition.

I am going to share how you can help improve their sleep.

Welcome to another edition of Hospitality Property School.

I am your instructor, Gerry MacPherson.

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According to the JD Power’s 2019 North America Hotel Guest Satisfaction Index Study, just 29% of hotel guests surveyed said they had a “better-than-expected” quality of sleep. The majority of guests who had a good night’s sleep at a property said they would return.

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I have always said,

“At a basic minimum, every hospitality property has to provide a clean facility and a comfortable bed”.

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At some point, we are all hospitality property guests, whether it be in a hotel, resort, inn bed & breakfast, or Airbnb. It does not matter if we are travelling for pleasure or business, there are times when getting a good night’s sleep can be a taxing proposition.

Sleep is critically important for general health and well-being of everyone and the better you sleep, the better you live, work and play.

As a hospitality property owner or manager, there could be many factors that affect your guest’s sleep that is out of your direct control. However, there are ways that you could help create a more comfortable, memorable sleep environment for your guests.

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Bedding

Of all the items guests come into contact with during their hotel stay, bedding probably signifies the biggest percentage. Pillows, comforters, duvets, sheets, blankets and bed skirts are normally the first thing a guest might notice when they walk through the door.

How they look, feel — and smell — is important. As the saying goes, you never get a second chance to make a first impression.

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The Quality of the Mattress Matters

Mattresses have become so technological that some are even based on research from NASA, the US space agency and are called ‘sleep systems’.

They can cost up to $50,000 apiece, but is it really necessary to fork out that kind of money to give your guests a good night’s sleep when you can do it for between $1500 and $2500?

One thing is for sure, you cannot cheap out and expect guests to return or leave you a good review spending less than $300. A mattress in that price range will certainly not ensure your guest a good night’s sleep unless they are very young or very light.

Cheap mattresses also need to be replaced more often, as frequently as every two years. Invest extra, at least $1,500, and you should not need to change the mattresses for 10 years, go the higher end and they could last up to 25 years.

A good rule of thumbs is to spend as much as you can afford but you should keep in mind that some mattresses might have a five- or seven-year warranty on them. To me that means the mattress will need to be replaced relatively soon, so you should be looking that mattresses have at least a 10-year warranty.

Using platform beds in place of traditional box springs is one way North American hospitality properties have recently adopted European influences. In addition to design opportunities, platform beds can offer cost savings.

Having that design does not detract from the sleep experience, and it’s as good as having a box spring. Platform beds also make the furniture more multipurpose. For example, include drawers as well as headboards that can double as desks.

It is also important to have a two-sided mattress that allows property staff to flip and rotate the mattresses quarterly to extend lifespan.

Not remarkably, the bed your guests sleep on, its comfort and performance are key in helping them achieve a sound, restful sleep. Hospitality properties need to work with bed suppliers who understand hospitality industry requirements and develop products and solutions to meet them.

It is also important to have strong warranties and responsive customer service to better minimize business disruptions.

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Other ways to ensure your guest have a good sleep is to promote quiet.

Not all sources of guestroom noise are within your control but many are.

For example:

  • Leaky faucets

 

  • buzzing light fixtures

 

  • loud heating, ventilation, and air conditioning or HVAC equipment

 

  • and windows

These should be addressed immediately before any of your guests have the opportunity to complain.

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And still, another way to ensure your guest have a good sleep is to promote peace

  • Blackout drapes

 

  • Eye masks

 

  • Earplugs

Your housekeeping staff is your first line of defence.

Add possible sources of noise to the room checklist so that your maintenance personnel can be informed and take action to resolve any found issues.

Major hospitality property brands worldwide continue to make the guest sleep experience a priority and are investing significantly toward this goal and this is a topic we are going to continue researching.

What do you currently do to ensure your guests have a great sleep? Let me know in the comment section.

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If you are a member of the Hospitality Property School Group, I have included in this week’s updated episode, more to consider when wanting to offer your guests a great night sleep.

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